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Domodah beef and groundnut/peanut stew recipe

This shows a way to make Domodah beef stew, a delicious sauce prepared with slight variations in Gambia and other countries in West Africa.

This shows a way to make Domodah beef stew, a delicious sauce prepared with slight variations in Gambia and other countries in West Africa.

Ingredients

For:  4 servings

Instructions

  1. Cut meat into relatively small cubes
  2. Use about 1 - 2 tablespoons of oil to fry the meat on a hot flame, in hot oil for about 15 minutes - until almost cooked. This & the small cubes above shorten general cooking time. Not much oil should be used as the groundnut paste has a lot of it.
  3. In the meantime, chop the onion and the other vegetables
  4. add the onion to the meat & fry for a couple of minutes
  5. add vegetables [Some prefer to add the vegetables in the last 15 or so minutes, so they do not get overcooked and too soft, which I think is not a bad idea at all]
  6. add hot water and then the groundnut/peanut paste and mix so no lumps form
  7. add the tomato paste and the spices and bring to the boil and then on LOW heat, cover and cook until the meat is tender.
  8. You will need to repeatedly stir, to ensure no scotching at the bottom. The danger for this is much more in a non-teflon pan. It might require adding some water. It is the beef that takes the bulk of the preparation time. The groundnut sauce is generally speaking ready if you see oil raising to the top - some folks say.

Recipe notes

A teflon pan is highly recommended.

I used a small of a super-hot habanero pepper instead (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habanero_chili ). They have a very nice aroma they add to the sauce, though they need to be treated with care, unless you come from some West African countries where people seem to be immune to their hotness. In many places in West Africa, sauce without (very hot) pepper is considered tasteless, at least to countless people from Guinea, Nigeria, Cameroon, Gambia, etc I have talked to. There are apparently some variations in the way Domodah is prepared, with varying vegetables, which are optional and spices. So take this as a recipe you can refine to your taste … and feel free to share your version.

Some folks do not seem to consider the ingredients complete without some form of Maggi bouillon cube or 2 … Domodah can be eaten with rice, potatoes, fufu, sweet potatoes, cassava & much more. A juicy salad makes a good accompaniment.

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